Recent NCCC Actions

November 2017 to May 2018

Advocacy carried out by dedicated N3C volunteers in the last seven months to protect and preserve the North Cascades lands, waters, plants, and wildlife.

EXPANDING, ESTABLISHING, and PROTECTING WILDERNESS AREAS

Why it matters: Federal land designation as Wilderness and Park is the gold standard of ecosystem protection, precluding most damaging industrial and commercial exploitation.

  • Signed two joint letters opposing congressional legislature bill riders exempting the Tongass
    National Forest in Alaska from the Roadless Rule. The riders failed!
  • Signed joint letter objecting to expansion of the Excelsior Mine into an Inventoried Roadless
    Area. The expansion was allowed based on the 1872 Mining Law.
  • Signed joint letter to the EPA objecting to repeal of the Clean Power Plan, which is reducing
    CO 2 emissions that contribute to climate change.
  • Signed joint letter to the Washington State legislature opposing inclusion of hydroelectric power
    generation as a “Renewable Resource.”
  • Signed joint letter objecting to expansion of the Swen Larsen Quarry Expansion into an
    Inventoried Roadless Area.
  • Signed massive joint letter to the Secretary of Agriculture opposing Alaska’s petition for an
    exemption to the Roadless Rule for the Tongass National Forest.

PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND RECREATION IN WILD AREAS

Why it matters: balancing access with economics and Wilderness preservation, we evaluate motorized use and places where it needs to be limited to reduce land impacts and recurring road repair costs.

  • Submitted comments to the Methow Ranger District on the proposal for 10-year renewal of
    Outfitter and Guide’s permits, stating the need for monitoring and enforcement.
  • Signed joint letter to Congress requesting inclusion of funding for Legacy Roads and Trails in
    the FY 19 budget.
  • Signed joint letter with 18 organizations commenting on trailhead parking plans at Wallace Falls
    State Park.
  • Signed joint letter supporting Snohomish County Parks grant application for phase 2 of the
    Whitehorse Trail development between Arlington and Darrington. The trail follows the old
    railroad grade beside the North Stillaguamish River and Highway 530.
  • Submitted letter to the Washington State Recreation and Funding Board supporting two grant
    applications from Department of Natural Resources for the Morning Star Natural
    Resources Conservation Area trails.
  • Signed joint letter to the Methow Ranger District supporting the Buck Mountain Trail
    Improvement Project.
  • Joined Leave No Trace (LNT) as a partner organization. See https://lnt.org/about/nonprofit-partners

PROTECTING ANCIENT FORESTS AND PROMOTING RESPONSIBLE FOREST MANAGEMENT

Why it matters: like real estate, they’re just not making ancient forest anymore. We seek to restore watersheds and fisheries damaged from decades of heavy logging and road building and protect significant forests from degradation.

  • Submitted comments on emergency road repairs to the Darrington Ranger District, citing need to
    remove 3 roads listed as “High Risk for Aquatics.”
  • Attended a DNR Meeting on the proposed Singletary Timber sales in the Reiter State Forest next
    to the Wallace Falls State Park.
  • Signed joint letter to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation objecting to the replacement Snow Lake
    water release control valve that is 60% bigger, increasing potential water withdrawal in the
    Alpine Lakes Wilderness.
  • Signed joint letter to the Forest Service committing on their advance notice of proposed
    rulemaking for NEPA compliance.
  • Submitted scoping comments to the Darrington Ranger District for management plans of the
    Monte Cristo area.
  • Met twice with the Darrington Ranger District to review the Stillaguamish Vegetation Project.
  • Attended a meeting of Snohomish PUD Commission to oppose a permit application for a low
    head hydroelectric plant at Sunset Falls. The application was withdrawn before testimony.
  • Signed joint letter with 120 organizations to Congress opposing the Federal Forest provisions in
    HR 2, aka the Farm Bill.

Photo by John Hechtel

PROTECTING WILDLIFE AND HABITAT

Why it matters: from microscopic fungi to top predators, the wilderness ecosystem’s living members are interdependent, so keeping viable populations of each species is essential to preserve the ecosystem for future generations.

  • Attended a meeting of Snohomish PUD Commission to oppose a permit application for a low
    head hydroelectric plant at Sunset Falls – The application was withdrawn before testimony!
  • Signed joint letter with 120 organizations to Congress opposing the Federal Forest provisions in
    HR 2, aka the Farm Bill.